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  1. Last week
  2. tommy7840

    Straining clamp

    Hello guys, What straining clamps are you using i have a steel one which we bolt together but i was looking for a better solution really.Has anyone used two bits of timber succesfully? Im thinking the wood would bite better and stop the slipping when pulled with the tractor.
  3. Earlier
  4. StarveacreFencing

    Protect post knocker hydraulic leak

    tepapa is spot on. We've had to replace one.
  5. oregonfarmfencer

    12.5 smooth wire

    I didn't know you could buy 12.5ga mild steel in coils. It must be for Chain Link? Mild steel or low carbon wire isn't much compared to high tensile. It has a much lower breaking strength, and is usually either class 1 or commercial galvanized. It would make a subpar electric wire. If it was me, I would take it back and get name brand 180 or 200KPSI high tensile wire. Also, pay more and get layer wound instead of coil wound. It unrolls so much better.
  6. Thegoatman22

    12.5 smooth wire

    The prob is its not even 170, is not hi tensile. I thought maybe for electric top lines. I like the 170 and 180. The 200 snaps everytime I try to tie a knot. When my brace wire fails, which isnt very often it is usually where the wire gets knicked from the teeth of something, or a fence is over stretched.
  7. oregonfarmfencer

    12.5 smooth wire

    The scrap bin is the best use for it. I would never use 170 KPSI. That stuff is so soft and breaks so easy. We tried to build braces with 180kpsi wire before and every one would blow apart. Use 200kpsi minimum, 210 if you can find it. I would take it back.
  8. Thegoatman22

    12.5 smooth wire

    I just bought 4 100 lbs rolls of 12.5 smooth wire. It was supposed to be 170 kpsi, but in typical form for that farm store they gave me non hi tensile. What kind of use does it have?
  9. Thegoatman22

    Metal H posts

    Done
  10. West Fork Fence

    Metal H posts

    I suppose it would be similar, but not suitable for muck or sand. Email me your phone number, and I'll send you a picture. luke@farmfencesolutions.com
  11. Thegoatman22

    Metal H posts

    Ok, so when I have a post that wants to lift up, but is on an existing fence I drive those duck bills from kencove. That would be a tiebacks then?
  12. West Fork Fence

    Metal H posts

    A tieback isn't the same as a foot, and doesn't mean that wire and knots have to be involved. It would just be an additional way to keep a turn post or strainer from heaving in light soil. Sometimes, after the wire is strung, we will have to weld from the top of a turn post, down to a very large stubby that is driven on the outside of the turn. Of course it's braced to the inside, but sometimes in muck or sand it'll want to lift no matter what you do. That's when we weld on a "tieback". It could also be done below grade, if there were a reason you couldn't have some bracing above grade. A stubby is the pipe driven all the way into the ground that the angled bit is welded to on the low side.
  13. Thegoatman22

    Metal H posts

    I totally misread you comment, sorry
  14. oregonfarmfencer

    Metal H posts

    I would.
  15. Thegoatman22

    Metal H posts

    What do you end up paying for that pipe?Looking online the 3 in is pretty expensive. I mean I do get that it lasts 10 times longer if not more
  16. Thegoatman22

    Metal H posts

    By tie back donyou mean foot the post?, and not sure what you mean by stubby? I must have miss read something earlier, I had thought you said you didnt need to tie the H post, glad I checked
  17. West Fork Fence

    Metal H posts

    I would drive them, even in soft soil. If it's that soft, weld some more on and keep driving. If it's soup, weld in a tieback after you plant 20' of pipe. We use SS40 galvanized here, since it's wet. A pipe H brace would still need some sort of diagonal support, so that's why you will normally see just an N brace, or an H with the N. I have seen some pipe H braces with a brace wire, and it proved effective. Like OFF says, the angled brace is a necessary part of a welded assembly. If it's soft, we'll use a "stubby" up to 10' long driven sub grade. Ol' Fence will be glad to see this conversation.
  18. Thegoatman22

    Metal H posts

    Why wouldn't you drive them?
  19. oregonfarmfencer

    Metal H posts

    2 7/8" oil pipe. I personally would drive them. Some swear by concrete though in soft soil. No tension wire on a welded H brace because it should have a diagonal going to a stubby pipe. I would skip the H and just build an angle. You want to make sure your stubby pipe is plenty deep 5'+. In place of welding, there are a few companies who make brackets, but they are spendy.
  20. Thegoatman22

    Metal H posts

    I want to revisit the metal posts instead of wood. What gauge and width pipe are you guys using, it looks like three inch. And are you cementing them in or just driving them. And since you weld the Hpost do you still need the tensioning wire on the H post
  21. Thegoatman22

    Tying small box wires

    I was just coming on to ask about doing this instead of striping knots and tying the non climb. I hate stripping non climb, so time consuming
  22. Mooresft

    Machine insurance

    I’m insured with Nfu with just a tracked machine, probably find quite a few on here are in the same situation. im paying around 1k a year for it tho!
  23. HenryG

    Machine insurance

    Now I’ve got my new tracked post knocker I need to get it insured so wondering who you all use? I use to use nfu for my previous tracked machine but now I no longer have a tractor to insure they will not insure it on its own. All replies much appreciated.
  24. PaulH

    New member

    welcome Charlie
  25. West Fork Fence

    New member

    Welcome along Charlie
  26. Charlieh

    New member

    Hi Joined the forum a while back but finally having a look around, Im based in Staffordshire and whilst not an out and out fencing contractor we have steadily increased the volume we are delivering over the last few years from about 1km a year up to 8 this winter. I specialise in sensitive sites so either steep, remote or very wet ground, running a range of gear that represents that. post knocker wise we run a 5ton bog tracked Kubota excavator with a big protech p220 on it and a larger bcs alpine tractor on dual wheels which I'm in the process of upgrading from the parmiter to most likely a protech P30. Here to expand my knowledge a bit, research kit and off any help that I can where possible Charlie
  27. tepapa

    Hi

    Welcome. How do you get on with the fence pro?
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