Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Last week
  2. MikeW

    gates

    Set your first post (the highest side if there is one) and then set your receiver and staff up to suit that ones height. When you have got the next one set up use you receiver on that post and adjust post accordingly, bringing it to the right height. There is usually 5mm or so tolerance so bare that in mind.
  3. tommy7840

    gates

    Some good ideas here.I have a laser level which for some reason we havent used for gate hanging.How do you use it for marking the posts?
  4. MikeW

    Tying small box wires

    I use 2.5mm wire and do however many termination knots i need to suit the netting, leaving enough of a tail and then crimp the tails to the netting and job done. Tieing off horse netting is very fiddly and also netting is much more likely to snap whilst doing so than straight plain wire. Alternatively do the same using standard gripples and use it to tension to, especially on shorter stretchs.
  5. Earlier
  6. RCCM

    How well are your posts treated?

    I think the bottom line over here with our treatment is it doesn't work, regardless of treatment penetration. Timber species is important but since 2004 when the arsenic was removed from the CCA treatment they may as well be spraying them in green paint for the level of protection it offers.
  7. RCCM

    Solonet or Quickfencer?

    Make your own... I did, cost about £500 all in, specifically for deer fencing although will do all other heights. Mounting it on the front loader of a tractor is not the best in my experience unless it's very large and we'll built. A tele handler is much better, stronger and you can simply boom out to tighten. In the mud I have had issues with the netting/clamp arm being so far to one side that the tractor gets pulled about when driving forwards to strain up. But less so with a tele handler.
  8. RCCM

    gates

    I use a laser level to mark the two gate posts and check for levels and any ground clearance issues. I have some cheap scissor car jacks to sit the matched pair on so you can wind them up or down to find level and slide them left or right to get my spacing on the posts identical and the gap in the middle. Then mark and drill them.
  9. Fence

    gates

    Just like a single gate only twice.......lol We rarely use wood, but when we do we use a welded metal frame will trusses. As in the bottom photo. That gate has been up ten plus years by the way. 8x10. The truss rods can be tightened or loosened to give a small amount of adjustment. No screws or bolts in any of my hinges. Every thing is welded up once the gates or right. And sometimes you just have to hang them. See where you screwed up, cut em down and do it again.............and never, ever ever ever ever let the customer pick up materials.
  10. West Fork Fence

    Solonet or Quickfencer?

    How will you be using it, loader mount or three point? In my limited experience with both of them, the Solo seems a bit better thought out. I tried a QF on a skid steer, and never could get as tight as I wanted, and I don't think the side load was doing the loader arms any good. The two Solo's I've been around were tractor and Solo track mounted, respectively. Only got to see one hitch with the little one, but the big Solo net was impressive, for the most part. Again, my experience with each is fairly limited. Tepapa has a pair of Solo nets, so maybe he'll be along soon.
  11. PaulH

    Hi

    welcome Dan
  12. tommy7840

    gates

    How does everyone hang double gates.We have done a lot over the years we happened to be doing some wooden drive gates and somehow it took a long time.It was a tidy job when we were done but sorry no pictures as we had to finish in the dark (shortage of materials by the customer) Thanks for any replys guys.
  13. Danvan

    Solonet or Quickfencer?

    I’ve been toying with the idea of these types of machines for a while. Any suggestions as to which is better? I’ve always tied off at each end, with box strainers. The Quickfencer looks more versatile with different attachments etc, but the solo net clamp system may be better?? Any thoughts appreciated. Thanks.
  14. Danvan

    Hi

    Hello everyone. Just introducing myself. I’m a farmer who’s done his own fencing for years, occasional contacting work and for other contractors. Have been to New Zealand in the past where I got the interest for fencing and their systems. I run a fence pro post driver imported from there. Thanks for having me🙂.
  15. West Fork Fence

    Gate and brace post

    12.5 gauge HT for your brace wire. 2 or 3 complete wraps in a figure 8 pattern. Tension and join with a crimp sleeve, a tex brown knot, a gripple, or a ratchet strainer. Gripple also makes a quick brace kit, and my wife will be glad to sell them to you. They are the handiest if you are only building a few braces. 844-48-FENCE
  16. Kjg26

    Gate and brace post

    Ok. That makes sense. The cross brace will still provide the same strength? Also. What size brace wire do yall use? Ive found 9g. 12g and 12.5 double strand
  17. Fence

    Gate and brace post

    Without knowing more it sounds like put your brace post to the same grade above ground as your gate post. In other words your horizontal brace will be parallel to the ground, not level. If you're dealing with the crown of a road and you can make both sides slope the same it will look better to the eye. There is a fair amount of "artistic license" to be used in these kinda deals. If you lack experience by all means mock it up to make sure you get a eye pleasing look. And pull that gate post up and dig it a foot deeper.
  18. Today I hooked up my Augur for the 1st time. I got my gate post drilled and Installed. The next post to be drilled is the brace post for this gatepost. The terrain slopes away from the gate post . Where the brace post will being drilled is about a foot lower than the gatepost. How do I go about doing this? The gate post is drilled to about 32" and tamped in place. No concrete.
  19. West Fork Fence

    How well are your posts treated?

    There is more to it than that. Shoot me a text, and I'll tell you what I know. Eight One Two 798 forty six 0 four. Not an appropriate conversation for the entire interwebs to find. Also, this is way cheaper than you think. ? http://protechmachinery.co.uk/html/products/P30-contractor.html
  20. oregonfarmfencer

    How well are your posts treated?

    I know this past spring we paid $22 for 2 7/8" x 10' raw oil pipe. Hard to justify when we can get a 4-5" x 8' wood post for under $7. Don't think people, or their pocketbooks, would go for it around here. But using galvanized pipe would definitely set a guy above and beyond the competition. Interesting to see the different solutions people have found in different parts of the country.
  21. West Fork Fence

    How well are your posts treated?

    It depends. Cheaper than creosote for us, but that’s just the front end. 100 years divided by 25 years equals a whole lot cheaper than anything you can buy. Nailing down efficient availability was the toughest part for us, but we figured it out. I’ll ask my guys about the left coast, and where you should look. Just loaded another pic for you. Took over a year to square that deal. You can’t judge book by the cover. Test results are a must these days.
  22. oregonfarmfencer

    How well are your posts treated?

    How's the cost comparison?
  23. West Fork Fence

    How well are your posts treated?

    SS40 Class III. Problems are over, and easier to install.
  24. oregonfarmfencer

    How well are your posts treated?

    Thanks that's interesting. They are supposed to be 25 year posts. CCA lodgepole pine, ACQ Doug fir, and Penta Doug Fir are the only posts readily available here. All 3 that are sold locally here in our experience are poorly treated. Virtually zero penetration of the treat! The pines would last 5 years give or take a few. Not good for business to say the least. We import these from Canada, they are not AWPA certified, but do meet Canadian ministry of agriculture and BC highway construction standards. There are several that were installed around here in the mid to late 90s as part of VSP trellis systems, still standing strong. In recent years trellis installation has gravitated towards all steel. We've experimented a lot with posts. We had one customer specifically request ACQ Doug Fir, within two years the fence had experienced approximately 50% post failure. And of course all our steel posts are still standing.
  25. West Fork Fence

    How well are your posts treated?

    I added some pictures for you. At first glance, I would have thought that to be a pretty bad post. All wood is not created equal, and it appears that you have a well treated post, assuming the retention rate is up to snuff, and there really is that much heartwood in there. If that were southern yellow pine, it’d be a five year post at best. The pic with the last paragraph outlined in red should be of particular interest. You are entitled to test results.
  1. Load more activity
×