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GMS Timber

Tanalith or Creosote?

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Mole valley were offering a 15year guarantee on some of their posts which I believe came from the same supplier but the amount you could possibly claim went down year on year.l went to inspect a UC4 only last night that had failed after two years,I could not see that it had suffered from an impact and although the heart of the post looked ok there was certainly signs of deterioration through the first 20mm maybe just one rogue post but scary and still needs replacing.

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This guarantee issue is a bloody joke if you ask me,

I asked a timber supplier, James Jones, about any way it would not be valid.

 

Cut a notch for the stay- void.

Cut top off-road void.

Make a hole with staple,/ nail - void.

 

Unless you treat the barbed wood with creosote, but how can you prove you used proper creosote.

 

They will use any reason to not fulfilled t be so called guarantee.

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Every CCA "treated" post I put in the ground from 2007 thru 2010 rotted off.  When I say every, I mean every last one of them.  I went so far as to buy posts from another "respected" fence company, and made it clear that I didn't want any material from the offending treatment facility/broker.  It took some digging later on to find out that the "respected" fence man and the aforementioned broker had conspired to run me out.  To date, I have replaced every post for every customer that got in on that trash......except for the 3 miles of my own fence that has fallen down.  It still makes me sick when I bid a job and get beat out by that crook.  Needless to say, I have little patience for junk products and the people who represent them.

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we have just done a 2500m job for the forestry commission in Creosoted timber

 

We took an old fence down that was put up in 1956/7 using locally grown and creo treated posts by the local estate, 60 years from the post and some of them we reused. The carbon footprint of this timber must be minute and the environmental impact must again be small.

 

With modern treatments the same fence would need replacing 6 times. Six times the timer, six times the impact from felling, hauling, machining, treatment, hauling back out then installing.

Now if thats better for the enviroment than one treatment of creosote I'll eat my hat

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Yes sometimes the environmentally worse idea is best in the long run. As proven in Robs case.

A few years ago someone told me the soil association didn't allow treated posts to fence cows for organic production. If that still applies I wonder how it's working out for them?

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Yes sometimes the environmentally worse idea is best in the long run. As proven in Robs case.

A few years ago someone told me the soil association didn't allow treated posts to fence cows for organic production. If that still applies I wonder how it's working out for them?

Probably not far off what standard treatment has been doing goaty!? ????

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Creosote for agri and equine use is not banned and is a worry when someone says he can supply and does not know the regulations concerning its use as it cold end up anywhere and give us all a bad name

Using a professional treater and supplier is always the best option as many imported items only use a shale oil treatment and not old fashioned coal tar creosote impreganted under heat and pressure. You get what you pay for and I know some compainies who have problems with imported  "creosote" where in a good rain it partly washes off .

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The regualtions are clear creosote is not banned totally, it is banned only for domestic, Creosote can be used by commerical business which cover agriculturial and equine usage. Any professional supplier/erector will know this fact.

The biggest issue is still cheap imports which are dipped and not heat pressure treated or which use shale oil which looks and smells very similiar but that is all and does not last like creosote which has a long history of use.

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Having just joined this forum i have seen many opinions on the subject of tanalith or creosote, all have been well informed and constructive. As i have a vested interest in the topic working in the industry, can i offer you a third option, Postsaver sleeves. The treatment issues we are all facing at the moment are well documented and as we all search for alternatives we sometimes get swayed or influenced by what we hear or what we read. I have stated on these forums that i am not here to bash the treatment companies, they have enough problems! The Postsaver sleeve is a proven low cost high performance solution to the premature decay problem and carries a twenty year guarantee! The sleeve is an environmentally sound option as it saves the contractors from dealing and handling creosoted products as well as not having creosote leaching into the ground once installed. There is also the fact that when applied to a pressure treated post, the sleeve will hold in more of the treatment where it should be, in the post not leaching into the ground! Yes, i see the comments about being a little longer to apply but surely these tried and tested sleeves are worth some front end work to ensure back end post life longevity? It is my opinion that these sleeves will start to become more popular in the near future as we are about to embark on marketing campaigns including

direct to you guys through this medium and through Fencing News/Farmers and Builders Merchant platforms.

I have offered before, i will offer again, please let me send you our new handbook outlining our product and what benefits it can bring you, then you can decide for yourselves.

Please send your contact details to me at allan.poole@postsaver.co.uk, either email or postal address.

Thank you for reading.

 

 

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