Jump to content

oregonfarmfencer

Contractor
  • Content Count

    143
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    6

oregonfarmfencer last won the day on June 19 2018

oregonfarmfencer had the most liked content!

About oregonfarmfencer

  • Rank
    Advanced Member

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Oregon, USA

Recent Profile Visitors

1,070 profile views
  1. oregonfarmfencer

    12.5 smooth wire

    I didn't know you could buy 12.5ga mild steel in coils. It must be for Chain Link? Mild steel or low carbon wire isn't much compared to high tensile. It has a much lower breaking strength, and is usually either class 1 or commercial galvanized. It would make a subpar electric wire. If it was me, I would take it back and get name brand 180 or 200KPSI high tensile wire. Also, pay more and get layer wound instead of coil wound. It unrolls so much better.
  2. oregonfarmfencer

    12.5 smooth wire

    The scrap bin is the best use for it. I would never use 170 KPSI. That stuff is so soft and breaks so easy. We tried to build braces with 180kpsi wire before and every one would blow apart. Use 200kpsi minimum, 210 if you can find it. I would take it back.
  3. oregonfarmfencer

    Metal H posts

    I would.
  4. oregonfarmfencer

    Metal H posts

    2 7/8" oil pipe. I personally would drive them. Some swear by concrete though in soft soil. No tension wire on a welded H brace because it should have a diagonal going to a stubby pipe. I would skip the H and just build an angle. You want to make sure your stubby pipe is plenty deep 5'+. In place of welding, there are a few companies who make brackets, but they are spendy.
  5. oregonfarmfencer

    Recent Fences

  6. oregonfarmfencer

    How well are your posts treated?

    I know this past spring we paid $22 for 2 7/8" x 10' raw oil pipe. Hard to justify when we can get a 4-5" x 8' wood post for under $7. Don't think people, or their pocketbooks, would go for it around here. But using galvanized pipe would definitely set a guy above and beyond the competition. Interesting to see the different solutions people have found in different parts of the country.
  7. oregonfarmfencer

    How well are your posts treated?

    How's the cost comparison?
  8. oregonfarmfencer

    How well are your posts treated?

    Thanks that's interesting. They are supposed to be 25 year posts. CCA lodgepole pine, ACQ Doug fir, and Penta Doug Fir are the only posts readily available here. All 3 that are sold locally here in our experience are poorly treated. Virtually zero penetration of the treat! The pines would last 5 years give or take a few. Not good for business to say the least. We import these from Canada, they are not AWPA certified, but do meet Canadian ministry of agriculture and BC highway construction standards. There are several that were installed around here in the mid to late 90s as part of VSP trellis systems, still standing strong. In recent years trellis installation has gravitated towards all steel. We've experimented a lot with posts. We had one customer specifically request ACQ Doug Fir, within two years the fence had experienced approximately 50% post failure. And of course all our steel posts are still standing.
  9. oregonfarmfencer

    How well are your posts treated?

    Thanks. 4" diameter CCA lodgepole pine.
  10. oregonfarmfencer

    Oregon, USA Fencing

  11. oregonfarmfencer

    Senco Cordless Stapler

    Never heard of the Senco, I do believe the Fasco is a decent alternative to the Stockade. They are all more expensive than the traditional hammer method. If I were going to do it I would go for the Stockade and get the best.
  12. oregonfarmfencer

    Rusting netting

    Is it possible the galvanization on the wire was damaged somehow during install?
  13. oregonfarmfencer

    Measurement app

    I believe the tornado app does that.
  14. oregonfarmfencer

    Modification or add on equipment for tracked driver?

    Better yet, a cooler for the summer and a propane stove for the winter.
×