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POST SAVER/ TUFF DIP


tepapa
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Does any one use or have experience of either "Post savers" or "Tuff dip" or even recycled plastic posts?

 

Every day I lose more of the little faith I have in talnalised timber and agricised, but not everyone wants to pay for creosoted wood.

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I have not used the post saver or the dip but I did price the sleeves up recently and there wasn't a lot of difference to buying creosote timber. The only reason I looked at it was because of availability on creosoted timber. Trouble is, creosote is hard to beat and I think it makes a lovely looking fence.

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I have used tough dipped posts in the past, I  went to redo a fence I patched up 3-4 years ago where I used tough dipped posts and 90% were still good.

I wont touch agricised to be honest, its only mixed merchantable white wood and tanalith-e with lots of little holes spiked in it. You wont beat properly dipped winter cut chestnut or 15yr redwood at the minimum. I only use Jacksons 25yr strainers, they are very good value and weigh a ton because the treatment is right the way through and pours out when you knock a staple in

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The jury are still out on the tuff dip posts for me not been in the ground Long enough to give my opinion   but don’t do like I did and leave the dame unused stuff in a shed that is not frost protected chucked hundreds of pounds worth away it just set in the container  :(

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We use a lot of post savers here in essex. Started using a lot for the Network Rail jobs as their spec altered to require all timber posts to be fitted with either post savers or a bitumen dip. We went with the sleeves as there are a couple of suppliers that will supply the timber with sleeves applied saving us a lot of time. We have offered them for the last 5/6 years but now use them on about half our work (other half either HC4 or chestnut) as awareness of the poor effectiveness of the timber treatment is being realised by clients. They thought we were trying to sell them an extra they didn't need back then.

 

Talk to postsaver about price, always been good to us, now get 20% off as min and up to 25% on big orders. 3-4" rounds are about 72p plus fitting which I estimate costs us about £1/post so adds about £0.60/m, cheap if it turns a 6 year fence into a 20 year one.

 

All that said only been doing them 5/6 years so I can't say for sure, I only know none have failed yet and I can't say that for some tanalithe products that have been in the same duration.

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We just use creosoted strainers and HC 4 intermediates ,now most customers are aware of the problems with standard timber. The cost per metre extra is well worth the extra investment. The main problem we have is getting the suppliers to stock enough of these materials instead of filling there yards with inferior rubbish!

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  • 5 months later...

Seeing tuff dip for the first time the other day. I thought it does seem to have potential. The seller did say buy only what you would use as it sets within a year maximum. 6 month recommended.

Bearing in mind it needs a cure period of 24hrs in summer and longer in winter to set hard. Has anyone applied it and charged the extra for labour and material?

 

I was thinking it would make a good bad weather undercover job. But can you charge for extra successfully?

 

Wire is sorted it lasts. It's just getting the timber to last with it.

 

I feel something needs to be recognised in the next few years otherwise fencing is going to get a bad name.

 

A lot of really old stuff is still solid, there must be a modern cost effective way.

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Hi Goaty, we've tried both and use post saver sleeves for that reason. For us they are:

- easy to cost per sleeve for various size posts

- easy to cost for time to apply per sleeve as all blow gun on the same rate speed per size (about 1 per minute on avg on own inc re-handling etc)

- carry 20 yr guarantee when used on hc4

- don't go off

- easy to calculate qtys per jobs (no excess or guessing on fluid left)

- can use 5mins after applying, so can fit on site and get going straight away while boy is fitting the rest if needed.

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No worries, started using on rail jobs as it was a requirement, now use them on about 1/3 of all jobs these days. Always offer them as an option on the quote costed seperately, can't complain that we haven't made everyone aware of the treatment problems and solutions, up to each client to make their own educated choice.

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Had very bad experience with Tuff dip. Used it on dads farm and within a year most had washed off. When we contacted Tuff dip they accused us of lying and said it must have been frost damaged, highly unlikely when we treated them in October. In the end we were in the process of taking them to small claims to get our money back when dad got ill and the whole thing got left.

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John, that plastic posts are bloody freaky!

I did a job to a guy who when he moved into the place had them on every fence line.

He had them all replaced with timber and he would sell them if he found a victim!

I put a two line fence up along a bit where he had left some and putting a staple in was bad , you have to drill a pilot hole first and in the frost just forget it,

I haven't chapped any in ground, but I would like to try them.

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I have tried knocking in a plastic post and it went in fine in very hard (dry) ground.  Trouble I found with them is that they are very flexible and I think weaker than wood at equal sizes. I tried pushing a post sideways to straighten and it broke in the ground as the top had moved that far with the flex without moving in the ground. a wooden post would have broken at some point but I felt the plastic post had broken sooner.  Not the easiest either to put in staples but they will go with persuasion although I haven't tried a staple gun.

 They wont replace wood but I can see them useful across a bog or wet land.

 

I haven't tried a strainer yet. 

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I will post a picture of some plastic posts we did a trial on about a year ago. Although they are very popular in Germany and Eastern Europe they put very little tension on their fences and posts aren't driven very deep.  

 

The strainer we used was 150mm diameter reinforced with a moulded in scaffold pole... it bent!.... We also found that knocking them in was a bit of a nightmare - once they go off square they start bending and you can't knock them back straight. We had to rock spike every hole.  Stapling - you need a 30 x 3 staple as the material is much more dense than timber and 40x 4's bounce off... they are probably about 50% more expensive than timber... but apart from that they're fine... and those are the good ones made in Germany (I used to be the Sales DIrector - luckily they make other stuff as well!)... there is a company in Bodelwyddan that make some that have heavy organic contamination in them and these are prone to breaking

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