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What Is The Best Spec For This Post and Rail Job?


KevGee
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Hello all, I’ve just been quoted £1040 inc vat for the supply and fit of a 25 linear metre post and rail fence, I  don’t think there will be much chance of lowering the price, however, there may be an opportunity to obtain better value by asking for top quality materials to be used?

 

The job is a boundary fence between the back garden of a house and a field which is occasionally used for cattle. Access is good both sides and the ground conditions are also good. However, there is a difference in the ground levels between the garden and the field, resulting in the field being about 7 foot higher than the garden. A concrete “block on flat” retaining wall which terminates flush with the ground level of the field has been constructed to address this successfully.

 

I’d be really grateful if the professionals here on the forum could recommend what they personally consider to be the absolute best materials choice for this type job. As a customer I genuinely have no aesthetic preferences, all I seek is a good quality, sturdy fence that will stand the test of time. Thanks in anticipation.

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Say 4 rail sawn post and rail with Tornado stock netting? Stock netting to stop them putting heads through lower rails to nibble at any grass other side and putting undue pressure on fence.

 

6x3 posts and 4x2 rails?

 

Timber you want Creosote treated if possible, but UC4 as a minimum. UC4 can have various bitumous products applied to it before hand to make it last longer in ground contact.

 

Whether you would get that from your contractor is another matter....

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I agree that pressure treated Creosote would be the best option. The standard spec for the posts is 2.1m x 150 x 75mm for a 4 Rail fence and 1.8m long for a 3 rail fence. Rails normally 3.6m x 87 x 38mm. If creosote is not an option and I appreciate delivery could add a lump onto that depending on where you are the next standard is timber not just UC4 but treated to BS8417 2011 and 2014. This means that all ground contact timber will be incised to ensure that any exposed heartwood receives the minimum 6mm penetration required. Many smaller sawmills are not aware of the change in the British Standard and thus UC4 from October last year. Since the dreaded arsenic was removed form the preservation chemicals posts are failing early and the change in the standard reflects this.

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I would agree that price sounds high to me works out around £40, per metre, I would expect at that price to have mahogany or oak! With gold nails,

 

There are several specs personally like the look of 4 rails equally spaced or 5 rails with the bottom two rails closer together,

 

I'd agree go for the 4x2 rails, but an option is go for 4inch round posts, the reason is that a carpenter told me that the water sits in between rails and square posts whereas round posts mean there is no flat surface especially meeting which means water doesn't sit the same, I've used the 4 inch rounds on three jobs and they worked well, being 4 inch there is plenty of timber for attaching rails,

 

There is pictures of this on the gallery.

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Sincere thanks to all those who have replied. So, my current preferred spec based on the above is;-

 

25m Post and Rail Fence

All Pressure Creosoted, Sawn Redwood Posts and Rails (Creosote deemed to be okay as the fence will be in an agricultural field approx 7' above the garden)

2 – 8’x 8”x 6” Strainers

13 – 6’ x 6”x 3” Posts

21 – 12’ x 4” x 2” Rails (3 Rail Fence)

25m - 8/80/15 High Tensile Stock Netting

50m - High Tensile Steel Barbed Wire

4” Galvanised Ring Shanked Round head Nails

1 Pack 4 x 40mm Galvanised Staples

 

Posts 2’ in ground 4’ out of ground

Strainers 4’ in ground 4’ out of ground

 

Does this sound about right? Thanks again guys.  

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As stevew has pointed out, creosote is now a restricted substance in a domestic situation, so I think I would be wise to avoid it. However, daft as it may seem, I believe the farmer could use creosoted timber in this very same situation, so long as there is no risk of "frequent skin contact". I think the fence being 7' above the garden could reasonably be seen to satisfy this requirement but in order for me to personally comply I will definitely be looking for an alternative. So, my question now is, what would be the next best thing regarding potential longevity etc....UC4 Redwood? 

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If creosote is not an option and I appreciate delivery could add a lump onto that depending on where you are the next standard is timber not just UC4 but treated to BS8417 2011 and 2014. This means that all ground contact timber will be incised to ensure that any exposed heartwood receives the minimum 6mm penetration required. Many smaller sawmills are not aware of the change in the British Standard and thus UC4 from October last year.

Was that UC4 across the board or just 30yr/HA4 that needs incising now?

 

I had some material last week from a reputable mill and the HA4 is incised but the UC4 not?

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