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Driving 8x8


Marks
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its all about ground conditions, soft ground leave them blank, sandy then a 2 way point, up here its the longest point possible lol

 

the hardest thing is keeping them square on to where you want them, they are sods for twisting as you knock them, we use a big breaking/ felling bar to keep them straight

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its all about ground conditions, soft ground leave them blank, sandy then a 2 way point, up here its the longest point possible lol

 

the hardest thing is keeping them square on to where you want them, they are sods for twisting as you knock them, we use a big breaking/ felling bar to keep them straight

Given away my secret there! It works

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We have a hydraulic cap rotator on the Bryce

For 8 X 8? I didn't think they made em that big! I have one for post and rail 6x3. Does it bounce much Steve? Compared to just the post cap.

 

 

I like your varible adjustable one as well Charlie

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i have only once tried to drive one in and the post cap just bounced but i didnt point it though. Does the post cap damage the top as ours are pointed slightly on the tops.

 

Yes the peak will bruise unless you make a special plate to counter this. I just knock in upside down.

 

It's less bouncy with a heavy knocker and wetter ground.

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  • 2 months later...

I know this is an old thread, but on a similar vein...

 

When people knock strainers and gate posts in within 2-3 inches of eachother, what stops one pushing the other completely out of plum in one or both directions?

 

Which do people drive first, gatepost or strainer?

 

I normally separate them with rails and so avoid this problem altogether, but wanted to hear what others do?

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I know this is an old thread, but on a similar vein...

 

When people knock strainers and gate posts in within 2-3 inches of eachother, what stops one pushing the other completely out of plum in one or both directions?

 

Which do people drive first, gatepost or strainer?

 

I normally separate them with rails and so avoid this problem altogether, but wanted to hear what others do?

We hang our gates from the strainer here in the States.  What would be the reasoning for driving a separate gate post?  We have driven posts right up next to existing posts, and it does move them just a touch.  I suppose you'd need to account for it when you drive the first post?

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Maybe it's our softer ground, I've tried the one post does it all. Inevitably the fence pulls the post over and points the gates free end skyward. I thought this would be a problem for you too as you mention frost heave in another thread.

Most of our gate posts are 8ft 240cm or even less. Your longer posts will counter this. Ours are short due to costs probably and getting public liability insurance for going 2m and beyond is a right cost monger.

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I hang loads of gates off strainer posts and if the post is big and deep enough and the fence is struted properly it wont move.  They gate is only effected if small/ short posts are used and inproper strutting of the fence. I've seen plenty of gates sag where there is no fence attached but an inadequate post was used.

 

For some grant work I do, you can't hang the gate on the strainer so i knock the strainers in as close as possible.  Neither strainer effects the other much if any whilst driving, the only down side is it can be difficult to get close enough if you need to auger or spike the second strainer.

It saves on rails and installation  cost.

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I would happily do it but never been asked, and if I suggest it they look at me as if I've burst in their house Xmas day and pi$$ed on their kids!

So there's your answer as to why I don't do it. As standard.

 

There are occasions when it's necessary or preferred but very rare.

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Maybe it's our softer ground, I've tried the one post does it all. Inevitably the fence pulls the post over and points the gates free end skyward. I thought this would be a problem for you too as you mention frost heave in another thread.

Most of our gate posts are 8ft 240cm or even less. Your longer posts will counter this. Ours are short due to costs probably and getting public liability insurance for going 2m and beyond is a right cost monger.

So long as the bottom of the post is past the frost line, there usually isn't any heave.  That's interesting that your liability insurance gets expensive if you did past 2m.  Are there public utilities buried that deep?

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Hardly. Cable networks are barely buried often. Electric tends to be the most consistent at a good depth if done by the main electric network lads. Anything else is anywhere. Random, like spaghetti. Or 3 in one trench. I've heard of electric igniting gas then water putting fire out.

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