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Knocking in 5x3's....


trentwood
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We are about half way through knocking in 500m of post and rail with our new Protech tracked post knocker. Although the majority of posts are going in ok, a fair few have twisted on the way in, meaning that when we come to put the rails on they are not going to go on flush. How are people stopping this happening? and how ar people rectifying it after the post has gone in? Really keen to sort it our as going to leave a poor finish.......

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You will have to twist them as you are driving them in, impossible to straighten the post once it's down to the correct height, easiest way is a fork twister, bit like a Y shape........ I think Charlie Hubbard shared a picture of his twister on a previous post.....

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Try and fabricate yourself a post fork as I call it. Slots either side of the post and you can wiggle it as the post driver knocks it in. I have attached some photo's of mine, made out of pretty thick box section. Try and make it sturdy to withstand the strain. If you're a dab hand at welding you'll have it made in no time.

 

Hope this helps  :)

IMG 1850

IMG 1848

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A fork twister is the best and get the post early before too many hits and keep it low down (that way if you mark the post it gets buried). the fork bit needs to be strong but my handle is made from exhaust pipe which is strong and light and haven't managed to bend it yet. If its too heavy it will keep dropping and is harder work. Its no problem to knock and twist on your own, I hold the twister with one hand and knock with the other or wedge the handle against my waist. I have made a few fork twisters up to 8" for gate posts. The problem with holding them with a special post cap is the post can go all the way in twisted and when you take the cap off it will spring round by which time its too late. Another thing you can do is twist a bit when railing up and good nails will bring it all a bit squarer

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A fork twister is the best and get the post early before too many hits and keep it low down (that way if you mark the post it gets buried). the fork bit needs to be strong but my handle is made from exhaust pipe which is strong and light and haven't managed to bend it yet. If its too heavy it will keep dropping and is harder work. Its no problem to knock and twist on your own, I hold the twister with one hand and knock with the other or wedge the handle against my waist. I have made a few fork twisters up to 8" for gate posts. The problem with holding them with a special post cap is the post can go all the way in twisted and when you take the cap off it will spring round by which time its too late. Another thing you can do is twist a bit when railing up and good nails will bring it all a bit squarer

I do the low down twist, from r the same reason and it gets things back inline quicker as well. As someone else mentioned in another thread a tree felling lever is a great post twister. One size fits most if not all. I have the Bahco 1.2m one.

Sometimes I let a twisted post have its own way,it can spoil the line but only a fellow fencer would ever notice. We are only conscience of it because we aim for perfection.

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I use the hand twister to start off at the very beginning of driving using a tight low string line to get them as straight as possible if we get to the point of having to fight with them all the way as its too dry or stony we give up with that and then use our rectangular rock spike to make a perfect hole takes a bit longer but much better result .. Oh and we always use flat ended posts in 5x3's points tend to send them a lover the place

 

Take a look at this video

 

https://www.facebook.com/201676763210091/videos/1014100995300993/

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  • 1 month later...

Well when I get a spare day from other activities, we are doing a 270m post and rail around an ancient paddock with an ancient hedgerow, some which are now mature trees. The Bryce has been fantastic with its hydraulics and mast getting in to awkward positions. However I have had to dig three in so far due to trees being in the way. We are using the hydraulic cap and felling lever to twist. But roots have won a few. The client wants it as near the boundary as possible. I'm resigning to a poor finish, he's ok with that. One will also have to have a foot cut off the top which we never do.

In this case I really think it's going to cost in broken posts and lots of time if I get too fussy.

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