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Strainer as a gate post?


pencoed
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I'm new to fencing and will be working with a local contractor to install and 800 metre deer fence. We are using chestnut posts and strainers with tornado wire. I need to put three gates at different positions to access woodland and the road. Can I use a strainer as a gate post, fixing the fence one side and the gate the other? 

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In America, it is standard to hang gates from a braced strainer. In our soil and freeze/thaw conditions, a gate hung from an unbraced post would would sag to the ground in no time. It is very rare to see a separate gate post here. Our situation is different from yours, so I'll defer to the local experts.

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I wouldn’t if the decision  was mine however I have been overruled by the customer in the past and done it.

Was at a job I did 9 years ago and the gate was fixed as you describe and if I am honest nothing has been compromised. 

Thanks Red Stag, was the strainer braced with a strut? 

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In America, it is standard to hang gates from a braced strainer. In our soil and freeze/thaw conditions, a gate hung from an unbraced post would would sag to the ground in no time. It is very rare to see a separate gate post here. Our situation is different from yours, so I'll defer to the local experts.

That's interesting. How do you brace the strainer? with a strut going down into ground?

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As Brent will agree, up here 90% of all gates are usually tied! Or hung direct from the strainer of the fence line.

 

Sorry mooresoft. Up here it means buying two more strainers which are more expensive, so whilst yes it should not be done it is common practice here and I've nevcnevcer found it an issue yet.

 

I hasten to add the strainers are stayed.

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Just not a fan of it. In wet fields sliding through a gatepost happens. If all you have to replace is a post it's easy, snap an end post off a strained fence line and it's a bigger issue.

 

Down here (in NZ) I've never once seen a double post used and always wondered what the reasons for it might be.  I do get to replace a few strainers that the tractor's duals have caught on, but we usually are replacing a 3.67 gate with a 4.2 and that's problem solved.

 

Besides the above are there any other reasons for a double post ??

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Just not a fan of it. In wet fields sliding through a gatepost happens. If all you have to replace is a post it's easy, snap an end post off a strained fence line and it's a bigger issue.

I see the reasoning as you mentioned, and yes it make sense but whilst I would have no problem doing it it just isn't the done thing here.

 

On my travels though I am seeing it done, and if I know the cost of two extra pieces on timber is not an issue then I go go for it. There is another case for putting rails on you can suggest that the farmer can use them to climb in to field rather than the gates that they seem to like using.

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Also where we are we have a lot of banks, fences both sides. Therefore the gateways are in the middle of the bank and need railing out in order for the strainer to be in line with the rest of the fence.

 

I guess the only other reason is movement. A gate is nominally 4ft, if your hanging level on sloping ground there's a good chance your going to need four and a half foot out of the ground, maybe a touch more.

 

That's more out of the ground than I would have on my strainer.

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Generally on stock fence we usually use a separate post and on any grant work, it is required.

On deer fencing we have often been asked to hang of the strainer posts, when we do,this we generallynuse box strainers and never had any problems yet. Although we will always pull the wire tight and staple it up and hang the gates last thing, once strainers have settled.

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Besides the above are there any other reasons for a double post ??

Our area is deep topsoils oil with gravel or clay deep subsoil and the posts shift one way in summer and back again in winter, also tree roots thrust them about. whereas if its tensioned with wire it shifts and stays shifted.

This is my observation only.

I knock them in deep as well.

However never used a box strainer as part of a gatepost.

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Our area is deep topsoils oil with gravel or clay deep subsoil and the posts shift one way in summer and back again in winter, also tree roots thrust them about. whereas if its tensioned with wire it shifts and stays shifted.

This is my observation only.

I knock them in deep as well.

However never used a box strainer as part of a gatepost.

Cheers Goaty. I think we shall try a strainer with a box strut.

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