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  1. Last week
  2. Hello everyone. I hope you can help me understand the requirements for installing Torus fencing. I've not installed high tensile wire before, and am not sure about post spacings and strainer requirements, especially considering the extra tension compared to mild steel (assume a straight run over flat ground - I'll make the necessary adjustments at curves and undulations). I know fewer posts are required, but what would be the recommended maximum distance between intermediate posts? And between strainers on straight runs? I'm fencing for sheep. What about strainer construction? Are diagonal struts strong enough for the extra tension of the HT wire, or should I go for box strainers? What size of strainer posts is recommended? How about curves? What is the largest angle around a strainer before a strut assembly (as above) is required? (I'm guessing the greater tension is more likely to pull unsupported strainers sideways?) Any other tips on installing HT compared to MS? Thanks very much for any advice or information you can give.
  3. Kermit the fencing frog here. I will be installing some stock fencing soon and have light weight 1.2M stock fencing. I am going to join using Gripples. Does anyone know how tight to go. The stock is L10/120/15 Fonzie Bear told me that it needs to be as tight so as I can play the Banjo but I need something a little more scientific. Cheers
  4. Earlier
  5. Anyone have an rg30 for sale with the p22 knocker. Thanks. Bob
  6. Buy a Stockade and only cry once. If you want to give my wife a call, she'll fix you up with a stapler and the t post clips you were after. 844-48-FENCE
  7. Anyone have any experiance with the titan fence staple gun? It's like half the price of the stockade and the staples are like half the price as well.
  8. look for "Easy Twist T Post Tie".
  9. Has anybody come up with a better way to attach netting to the t posts? I hate t post clips and want something faster.
  10. Wood is no good. At least not for more than a stretch or two. Can you believe some folks are still using wood for fence post. The wedge type clamps work well but everything we've used we end up going back to a simple piece of pipe....
  11. Hello everyone. I hope you can help me understand the requirements for installing Torus fencing. I've not installed high tensile wire before, and am not sure about post spacings and strainer requirements, especially considering the extra tension compared to mild steel. I know fewer posts are required, but what would be the recommended maximum distance between intermediate posts? And between strainers? (Assume a straight run over flat ground - I'll make the necessary adjustments at curves and undulations). What about strainer construction? Are diagonal struts strong enough for the extra tension of the HT wire, or should I go for box strainers? What size of strainer posts is recommended? How about curves? What is the largest angle around a strainer before a strut assembly (as above) is required? (I'm guessing the greater tension is more likely to pull unsupported strainers sideways?) Any other tips on installing HT compared to MS? Thanks very much for any advice or information you can give.
  12. Hello guys, What straining clamps are you using i have a steel one which we bolt together but i was looking for a better solution really.Has anyone used two bits of timber succesfully? Im thinking the wood would bite better and stop the slipping when pulled with the tractor.
  13. tepapa is spot on. We've had to replace one.
  14. I didn't know you could buy 12.5ga mild steel in coils. It must be for Chain Link? Mild steel or low carbon wire isn't much compared to high tensile. It has a much lower breaking strength, and is usually either class 1 or commercial galvanized. It would make a subpar electric wire. If it was me, I would take it back and get name brand 180 or 200KPSI high tensile wire. Also, pay more and get layer wound instead of coil wound. It unrolls so much better.
  15. The prob is its not even 170, is not hi tensile. I thought maybe for electric top lines. I like the 170 and 180. The 200 snaps everytime I try to tie a knot. When my brace wire fails, which isnt very often it is usually where the wire gets knicked from the teeth of something, or a fence is over stretched.
  16. The scrap bin is the best use for it. I would never use 170 KPSI. That stuff is so soft and breaks so easy. We tried to build braces with 180kpsi wire before and every one would blow apart. Use 200kpsi minimum, 210 if you can find it. I would take it back.
  17. I just bought 4 100 lbs rolls of 12.5 smooth wire. It was supposed to be 170 kpsi, but in typical form for that farm store they gave me non hi tensile. What kind of use does it have?
  18. I suppose it would be similar, but not suitable for muck or sand. Email me your phone number, and I'll send you a picture. luke@farmfencesolutions.com
  19. Ok, so when I have a post that wants to lift up, but is on an existing fence I drive those duck bills from kencove. That would be a tiebacks then?
  20. A tieback isn't the same as a foot, and doesn't mean that wire and knots have to be involved. It would just be an additional way to keep a turn post or strainer from heaving in light soil. Sometimes, after the wire is strung, we will have to weld from the top of a turn post, down to a very large stubby that is driven on the outside of the turn. Of course it's braced to the inside, but sometimes in muck or sand it'll want to lift no matter what you do. That's when we weld on a "tieback". It could also be done below grade, if there were a reason you couldn't have some bracing above grade. A stubby is the pipe driven all the way into the ground that the angled bit is welded to on the low side.
  21. I totally misread you comment, sorry
  22. What do you end up paying for that pipe?Looking online the 3 in is pretty expensive. I mean I do get that it lasts 10 times longer if not more
  23. By tie back donyou mean foot the post?, and not sure what you mean by stubby? I must have miss read something earlier, I had thought you said you didnt need to tie the H post, glad I checked
  24. I would drive them, even in soft soil. If it's that soft, weld some more on and keep driving. If it's soup, weld in a tieback after you plant 20' of pipe. We use SS40 galvanized here, since it's wet. A pipe H brace would still need some sort of diagonal support, so that's why you will normally see just an N brace, or an H with the N. I have seen some pipe H braces with a brace wire, and it proved effective. Like OFF says, the angled brace is a necessary part of a welded assembly. If it's soft, we'll use a "stubby" up to 10' long driven sub grade. Ol' Fence will be glad to see this conversation.
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