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stevew
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That surprised me too, I was understood that the box strainer was better. However the box uses the base of the straining post as its strength against pulling pressure and a strut uses the foot, which can be wider and pressing against more soil for support.

 

I have had some movement on 8' strainers made as small h boxes (same as pics in our gallery) when using 4' horse nett but only rarely on stock nett. I was going to use big H boxes with 2 strainers for horse nett next time and see it moves, but perhaps a strainer strut (like mikes) dug in with a bearer is better & stronger? Any advice you guys have would be appreciated, we do more post and rail than netting.

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Box struts angled struts I was taught to use box struts in soft ground and angled strut in hard ground in soft ground I some time combine them starting with a box and strutting a angle off the box strut would post a pic but don't know how think Mike mite have a point though what do you boy's think I do tend to use more angled struts than box's because it's bloody hard down here got use them on deer netting though but that's where I tend to combine them

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I've not read the article I'll get a secondhand farmersweekly this week...

But Mike knows his stuff..

Regarding Boxs and Angle struts .. If you want to get really technical is all about physics and the Forces and resistance , I've got some drawings showing this from Sheffield university that a fella did for us years ago.. (We really are that sad)

Basically the pressure on the net pulls parallel with the ground , trying to move the strainer forwards a Box ( if wired right) transfers the force back to the bottom of the strainer in effect trying to pull it out the ground at whatever angle the wires are, but there is more resistance than force due to the tonnes of ground its trying to pull it through.. When or if the force becomes greater than the resistance that's when the strainer 'pops'!

With Angle strutts the force is transferd down the strut into the ground where again the resistance is greater than the force ( due to the tonnes of ground its pushing into) however with an angle strutt there is the Fulcrum effect to consider where if the strut angle is too great the force can lever the strainer out the ground . The optimum angle for the strutt is between 35/40degrees any greater and the fulcrum effect is increased and Any less angle = less resistance in the ground..

But f**k me wer gettin a bit over technical if ye strainers don't move and ye wires tight ..you must be doin ok so Crack on lads

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For me I'd be cutting a notch in the strainer that is just a graze out of the strainer, a stay mortice should act to stop the strainer twisting too, what he has done will not do that,

 

There is nothing to prevent that stay being compromised by an animal rubbing against it sheep are particularly notorious for this.

 

If I was to attach the stay in his way I would chap in a nail, much to my chagrin as I just hate nailing stays.

 

I also read with interest about having a strainer separate from a gate post, Now I've no problem with the whole idea, but up here it is just not the done thing to add extra timber expense for one more strainer and the required rails.

My customers just wouldn't buy it.

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I was taught the cross member in a box assembly (we call them H Braces) should be 2-2.5 x the height of your top wire. On a 4'fence that's a 8'-10'cross member. I was also taught that due to the geometry the 10' instead of 8' almost doubles the strength of the brace. If you take it to an opposite extreme, ever see some use 4' cross members? They jack out rather easily.

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This is all very well hanging gates off strainers but I have lost count of the amount of places I have been and had to re do gates as the chap before had wired onto the gate post, something had hit the fence, like a tree down and pulled the post back so the gate wont latch! Its against my religion to have wire anywhere near a gate post for this exact reason and if the customer moans then id rather not do the job. If the gate post is independent then all bar a bit of adjustment from time to time it will always work until the posts rot off or someone nicks it!

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Ben

You are correct ... If say you had a box/ H Brace that's was only 2ft the angle of the wires would be pulling the strainer almost vertically out the ground. If the length of the box is increased the angle of the wires is less , trying to pull the strainer through more earth .. Therefore withstanding more force greater resistance ..

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So

Ben

You are correct ... If say you had a box/ H Brace that's was only 2ft the angle of the wires would be pulling the strainer almost vertically out the ground. If the length of the box is increased the angle of the wires is less , trying to pull the strainer through more earth .. Therefore withstanding more force greater resistance ..

Basically the longer the H brace the better round about 3 m long .

 

Use clever guy need to keep it simple for me I don't want to miss anything in the jargon

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